FDA Approves Epidiolex (cannabidiol) Oral Solution to Treat Seizures Associated with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

FDA Approves Epidiolex (cannabidiol) Oral Solution to Treat Seizures Associated with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

In a Press Release published July 31, 2020, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves Epidiolex (cannabidiol) Oral Solution to Treat Seizures Associated with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC).  It was confirmed that Epidiolex can now be prescribed for seizures associated with TSC in patients one year or older.

The FDA previously approved Epidiolex as the first drug that contains a purified drug substance derived from cannabis. In 2018, after reviewing three clinical trials, the CBD solution was found to be a safe and effective treatment for patients aged two years or older who were suffering from Lennox-Gastaut and Dravet syndrome, being severe forms of epilepsy. 

FDA has now approved the third indication – TSC related seizures, to the list conditions treatable by Epidiolex and expanded the patient age range to allow children over the age of one suffering with Lennox-Gastaut or Dravet syndrome to access the treatment.

“The FDA continues to believe the drug approval process represents the best way to make new medicines, including any drugs derived from cannabis, available to patients in need of appropriate medical therapy such as the treatment of seizures associated with these rare conditions. This paradigm ensures new therapies are safe, effective, and manufactured to a high quality that provides uniform and reliable dosing for patients,” said Douglas Throckmorton, M.D., deputy center director for regulatory programs in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research in a statement. “The agency is committed to supporting rigorous scientific research on the potential medical uses of cannabis-derived products and working with product developers who are interested in bringing patients safe and effective, high quality products.”

GW Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of Epidiolex, announced on Monday, August 3, 2020, confirming that the FDA had approved EPIDIOLEX oral solution as a treatment for seizures associated with TSC.

“FDA approval of this new indication is exciting news for those with refractory seizures due to tuberous sclerosis complex,” said Justin Gover, GW’s Chief Executive Officer in a statement. Since EPIDIOLEX is already available to patients by physician’s prescription, patients with TSC can immediately access the medication. This label expansion, including the expansion of the age range in all approved indications, further demonstrates that the FDA process can continue to enable broader patient access to appropriately tested regulatory approved cannabinoid medicines. It also provides hope for these patients and their families and is yet another important milestone for EPIDIOLEX as a first-in-class antiepileptic drug.”

About Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)

According to Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance, TSC is Affecting approximately 50,000 in the United States and 1 million worldwide. TSC is a genetic disorder that causes non-cancerous tumors to form in vital organs; it is also the leading genetic cause of epilepsy and autism.

“Up to 85 percent of those affected by TSC experience seizures at some point in their lifetime,” explained TS Alliance President & CEO Kari Luther Rosbeck in a statement. “Unfortunately, existing medications don’t always effectively control them. Our organization and the TSC community certainly welcome a new option such as Epidiolex, which is the second FDA-approved drug specific to TSC.”

At least two children born each day will develop TSC, with an estimated rate of one in 6,000 newborns. People with TSC may experience a variety of seizure types. One of the most common is infantile spasms that typically present in the first year of life. The condition causes mostly benign tumors to grow in vital organs of the body (such as the brain, heart, skin, eyes, lungs, and kidneys) and is a leading cause of genetic epilepsy. People with TSC may experience a variety of seizure types. TSC is associated with a greater risk of autism and intellectual disabilities, with its severity varying widely. In some patients, the symptoms can be very mild, while others may experience serious complications. Many people with TSC live healthy and independent lives while enjoying challenging professions such as doctors and lawyers. The severity of the various aspects of TSC varies widely between patients, even between identical twins.

About EPIDIOLEX

EPIDIOLEX (cannabidiol) oral solution, a pharmaceutical formulation of highly purified cannabidiol (CBD), is an anti-epileptic medication with a novel mechanism of action. It is the first prescription, plant-derived cannabis-based medicine approved by the FDA. EPIDIOLEX has been indicated for the treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), Dravet syndrome, or tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) in patients one year of age and older. 

Further information about EPIDIOLEX is available at Epidiolex.com.

New Program Launched To Standardize Cannabis Testing Methods

New Program Launched To Standardize Cannabis Testing Methods

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has announced that a new program launched to standardize Cannabis testing methods and to aid commercial and forensic laboratories to accurately measure chemical compounds in marijuana, hemp, and other cannabis products.

The aim of the Cannabis Quality Assurance Program (CannaQAP) is to achieve accuracy in product labeling and help laboratories to distinguish between hemp and marijuana. 

While the labels on most cannabis products illustrate the concentration of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), without official testing methodology, laboratories can often differ in their testing techniques, in turn, providing ’unreliable’ results. 

It is therefore primarily the inconsistencies in testing results that the researchers at NIST are looking to address in the course of the program.

“When you walk into a store or dispensary and see a label that says 10% CBD, you want to know that you can trust that number.” —NIST research chemist Brent Wilson

To achieve the program’s objective, NIST is looking to partner up with a range of hemp testing laboratories. The first point of the CannaQAP effort will consist of NIST sending out hemp oil samples to the participating laboratories and asking them to measure the total of CBD and THC using their routine testing methods. Each lab will then test the oils and relay its results and techniques back to the NIST researchers. It is expected that further exercises will include the testing of plant material samples.

The data collected from the participating laboratories will then be evaluated. NIST is looking to publish the data anonymously so that the participating laboratories’ names are not revealed. Research chemist Melissa Phillips has stated: “Anonymity means that labs don’t have to worry about how their performance will be viewed. Our goal is to help labs improve, not to call them out.”

While the laboratories will not be named, the results will show how much variability there is between them. Furthermore, NIST is looking to publish the correct measurements, so that each laboratory can see how accurate its measurements were and how it performed compared to its peers.  

Once NIST researchers can review the results, and evaluate the scope of the inconsistencies, they will be in a much better position to issue guidance on best practices for cannabis testing. 

NIST has said it will be developing a standard hemp reference material, which will provide accurate measurement values that labs can use to validate their testing methods. One reason these measurements vary so much is that there are currently no reference materials for cannabis.

Finally, it is understood that the new federal CannaQAP endeavour might go beyond legal hemp products. “NIST is also planning to conduct future exercises with ground hemp and possibly marijuana,” the agency has indicated. “Those exercises will involve measuring a larger number of compounds, including terpenes—the chemicals that give different strains of marijuana their distinct aromas—and compounds that people don’t want in their cannabis such as fungal toxins, pesticides, and heavy metals. Future exercises may also include extracts, concentrates, distillates, and edibles.”

We will continue following the program and will provide updates as soon as new data comes to light. Be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to stay in the know.  Laboratories that are interested in participating in the program can find more information and register online

 

FDA Issues Draft Guidance on CBD Clinical Research and Submits CBD Enforcement Policy to OMB for Review

FDA Issues Draft Guidance on CBD Clinical Research and Submits CBD Enforcement Policy to OMB for Review

FDA Issues Draft Guidance on CBD Clinical Research and Submits CBD Enforcement Policy to OMB for Review

July 2020 has been a busy month in the CBD world whereby FDA issues draft guidance on CBD clinical research and submits CBD enforcement policy to OMB for review.

After much anticipation, the FDA has begun to address its policies on CBD. On July 21, 2020, FDA issued draft guidance on clinical research involving CBD-containing investigational drugs and other cannabis-derived compounds. Further, on July 22, 2020, the long-awaited draft guidance on CBD enforcement policy was sent to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for a review. 

To date, FDA’s movement has not officially changed the existing position on the legal and regulatory status of various CBD-containing consumer products, but more is expected. Still, the recent reports to Congress and draft guidance on investigations involving CBD and other cannabis-derived compounds do provide us with a glimpse of FDA’s current reasoning surrounding CBD.

Clinical Research Draft Guidance

On July 21, 2020, FDA issued draft guidance on quality considerations for clinical research where cannabis-derived compounds are concerned. The guidance titled “Cannabis and Cannabis-Derived Compounds: Quality Considerations for Clinical Research” builds off previous guidance FDA had issued regarding the quality and regulatory considerations that govern the development and FDA approval of cannabis products. The draft guidance highlights the following key points :

1. Sourcing of Cannabis

For many years, the only domestic source of cannabis for legal clinical research was the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Drug Supply Program (DSP), but with the changes made by the 2018 Farm Bill, hemp can serve as a source for cannabis cannabis-derived compounds for drug development. This change gives the investigational drug sponsors of clinical studies new options that do not involve the NIDA DSP.

2. Quality Considerations

Sponsors of cannabis-derived compounds will be expected to provide sufficient information to ensure the identity, quality, purity, and potency or strength of the investigational product. Furthermore, there will be a requirement to provide quantitative data regarding phytochemicals present in their proposed product, such as cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids. The guidance goes on to list several helpful resources from which sponsors may obtain more information about specific methodologies and other related insights. The guidance clarifies that cannabis is held to the same regulatory standards as any other botanical raw material, botanical drug substance, or botanical drug product; therefore, any FDA guidance that pertains to such items will also be helpful. 

3. THC Calculation

The guidance acknowledges some of the challenges of calculating THC and notes the importance of consulting the DEA before commencing drug-development activities. Amongst other things, the FDA recommends that sponsors calculate the THC level in their product candidates early in the development process to gain insight into its potential control status.

Cannabidiol Enforcement Policy Draft Guidance 

On July 22, 2020, the FDA sent its draft Cannabidiol Enforcement Policy to OMB for review. The scope and the contents of the document titled “Cannabidiol Enforcement Policy; Draft guidance for Industry” are not yet publicly available, but the industry is eagerly anticipating the long-awaited guidance on CBD enforcement.

While the full extent of the FDA’s intended enforcement consideration will be clear only when guidance is finally released, we expect, like many others, that FDA will focus its efforts on consumer products that carry the most significant risk to public health. Therefore, we anticipate that the enforcement guidance will focus on lawful marketing and transparency.

We will continue to monitor the FDA’s issuance of the enforcement guidance and update as soon as it passes the OMB review. Make sure to sign up to our newsletter for further updates. 

7 Steps To Choosing A CBD Cream

7 Steps To Choosing A CBD Cream

 

The world of skincare loves new products that soon turn into must-have commodities.  As of late, CBD skincare products have become the latest hit within the skincare field and have managed to convince even the most cautious users to try the new hype. The promised benefits offered by the power of CBD are too irresistible, but most importantly, they work. If you are considering adding something new to your skincare regimen, here are 7 steps to choosing a CBD cream. 

Step 1 – Explore what is CBD

CBD (cannabidiol) is a cannabinoid. It is one of two dominant cannabinoids in both hemp and marijuana (the other predominant cannabinoid found in both hemp and marijuana is THC).  The CBD products come from hemp-based CBD and contain less than 3% THC. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis that gives users a “high.” Marijuana, for instance, contains 5-30% THC.

While CBD creams and topicals will not get you high, they sure do have a range of benefits that make them excellent for skincare. 

Step 2 – Understand How CBD Creams Work

A CBD cream is a sort of topical product that is applied to the skin. Other types of CBD-infused creams or topicals include lotions and salves that are also absorbed through the skin. Put simply, a CBD cream is a cream infused with CBD.

CBD creams help nourish and protect our skin in endless ways. Our skin possesses an endocannabinoid system, which allows us to manage the creation of many different hormones and proteins. CBD particles are consumed through the skin’s epidermis layers to blend with cannabinoid receptors found on the skin’s surface and stimulate our body’s natural endocannabinoid system.

Several studies have proven that CBD is useful for relieving redness, itchiness, and other common conditions such as muscle and joint pains. While more research is required to reach definite conclusions about the potential of CBD creams, the evidence from the initial findings indicates that they could become a leader in skincare and health practices.

Step 3 –  Check The Amount of CBD

You will discover that there are various products on the market, such as CBD-infused creams and lotions that carry the purpose of hydrating and relieving ongoing skin conditions such as eczema. On the other hand, another highly sought-after form of CBD-infused cream is used to soothe aches, pains, and reduce inflammation. Topical CBD creams with naturally cooling ingredients are a preference of runners, athletes, and hikers.  The amount of CBD contained in different creams will differ, but as a general rule, you will want to look for ones that carry at least 200mg of CBD per container. 

While there is no set regard as to the correct amount of CBD a topical should contain, it is worthwhile to choose products in smaller containers with greater amounts of CBD.  

Step 4 – Check the CBD Source 

It is not merely the quantity of CBD in a cream to be considered, but also the quality. That being said, the quality here is not being measured in the sense of being good or bad, but instead the properties that suit your needs.

Assuming that you are not familiar with CBD terminology, it is worth mentioning that there are three main types of CBD: full-spectrum, broad-spectrum, and pure or isolate CBD. The contrasts between the three types focus on the types of compounds they contain, fundamentally THC.

Full-spectrum CBD creams will contain every chemical compound contained in cannabis. On the other hand, broad-spectrum CBD creams are CBD products that contain every chemical compound in cannabis except THC. Isolates are CBD products that contain only CBD, and everything else in the plant is taken out. There are over 100 cannabinoids known to exist in cannabis. Isolates are made by “isolating” the cannabinoid CBD from cannabis.

 It is, of course, a matter of personal preference, but nevertheless, one worth considering carefully.

Step 5 – Check The Ingredients

It is worthwhile to opt for organic ingredients whenever possible. That way, you will get all the benefits of the ingredients without any chemicals and pesticides.

While CBD has a lot of benefits by itself, those benefits can be further enhanced when paired with the right corresponding ingredients. For instance, some CBD creams are complemented with essential oils, vitamins, or antioxidants. 

You also might want to check for cooling components like menthol, especially if you are looking for a solution to muscle or joint issues.  A dash of menthol can provide a prompt soothing sensation while you wait for the CBD to absorb and kick in.

Furthermore, another thing to comprehend is the fragrance of your chosen CBD cream.  While some individuals enjoy the distinct hemp aroma, many prefer a more subtle fragrance.

Step 6 – Examine Certificate of Analysis

This is arguably one of the most important of the 7 steps to choosing a CBD cream. When buying CBD creams or other CBD products, be sure to check where it has come from. All reliable brands will be committed to transparency and provide a certificate of analysis for their stocks. This will allow you to view testing results with ease before investing in your purchase and using the product. These tests confirm the quantity of CBD in a product, and also guarantee that these products are free of toxic contaminants that could aggravate your skin. 

Ideally, you will want to look for products made from locally grown and certified organic hemp. Whatever you decide to purchase, be sure to ensure that the product has been lab-tested by a third party. It is advisable to be wary of products that do not provide quality testing information on their website or by directly reaching out to the brand. 

Step 7 – Understand How to Use CBD Creams

Topicals are intended to be rubbed into the skin, so you will apply them directly to the affected area. Depending on the additional ingredients in the product, you might be feeling sensations such as tingling or cooling. 

If you intend to use the CBD cream for pain, you should start to feel results fairly quickly. For other skin conditions such as eczema, a continuous periodic application might be required to notice substantial results.  

Be sure to always check the label on the packaging for specific directions from the manufacturer.

Final Thoughts 

CBD topicals are worth a closer look for anyone looking for a solution to their ongoing skincare concerns or simply trying something new. With the vast amounts of enthusiasm surrounding CBD products, recognizing ethical brands and knowing exactly what you should be looking for in a safe and top quality CBD cream is of importance. 

Looking where to buy CBD topicals after learing the 7 steps to choosing a CBD cream? Revexia offers topicals that will restore, rejuvenate and relax.

CBD Oil – How Is It Made?

CBD Oil – How Is It Made?

CBD Oil – How is it made? CBD or Cannabidiol has been trending in many product industries due to its versatile capabilities to influence health conditions such as pain, anxiety, inflammation, or stress. In this article, we will look at the process of how CBD oil is made. 

Phase 1: Growing

The growing phase is governed by various regulations, depending on the location where the farming takes place. This stage strives to deliver a high-class natural strain of hemp. 

In the growing process, the quality of soil is paramount, whereby the soil nutrient content and the soil texture need to be considered.  The best soil for growing hemp is usually loose, has high fertility and plenty of organic matter. Hemp is a plant that is capable of the phytoremediation process. This means that hemp will absorb whatever is in the soil it has been planted in. Hemp is so proficient at phytoremediation that it has been planted at the Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster location to extract radioactive waste from the soil

Hemp can be grown direct from seed or cloned from parts of the plant tissue. These parts can then develop their root systems and grow plants that are genetically identical to the real plant, which can grow year after year. Cloning provides for the swift production of vast numbers of genetically equal hemp plants. Some growers favor this method because it ensures the quality of every plant. While seeds are more straightforward to obtain, hemp clones can offer excellent consistency when it comes to hemp farming.  

Hemp plants are usually grown to readiness while being spaced well apart. This planting method has been developed explicitly for harvesting hemp for CBD oil. The plants are spread out to their mature size, and natural light nourishes the entire plant producing rich healthy plants.

Phase 2: Harvesting 

When the hemp plants have matured, they are harvested and spread out evenly in large warehouse spaces to dry out. The dry hemp is then milled to create a fine corse powder with a texture similar to coffee grounds. The procedure usually follows the specific standards of the industry. The product is then transferred to the manufacturing and processing facility.

Phase 3: Extracting 

The extraction phase is the process of separating cannabinoids from biomass. Many extraction solvents can be used to separate and collect the essential oils and compounds from the hemp. Producers routinely utilize a carbon dioxide (CO2) process, which utilizes non-toxic fluid CO2 as a solvent. 

To extract all the desired materials, the solvent is forced through the ground plant material. This pulls out the CBD, essential oils, and beneficial compounds. The dissolved ingredients must then be run through a highly engineered filtration system.

Phase 4: Distilling

This phase is the separation of cannabinoids components from their impurities such as terpenes and plant material via vacuum-assisted evaporation. Specialized equipment must be designed and calibrated in order to distill the hemp ingredients at the appropriate pressure, temperature, and vacuum frames in order to limit the degradation of the product. A high vacuum is favored to minimize the requirement for heat, which can degrade those delicate cannabinoids or change the overall activity profile.

Another key point of distillation is the decarboxylation process. In its natural form. CBD is not bioavailable or effective until it is heated lightly, and the acid group is removed, thus leaving the CBD molecule. The other significant results of the distillation process involve purification of all the additional cannabinoids, separating the terpenes, and removing what is left of the remaining impurities.

Phase 5: Isolating

The image of a further refined substance from the distillation phase is a purified, crystal white cannabidiol. In its truest form, these isolates are white crystalline particles comprised of 99%+ cannabidiols. All additional cannabinoids, plant materials, terpenes, chlorophyll, and oil is separated in the production of this powder. All that remains is naturally sourced CBD crystals that bear no odor or flavor. Consumers usually find CBD isolates attractive due to them being THC free. 

Phase 6: Adding a Carrier Oil 

Once the CBD is completely processed, a carrier oil can be added to make for more comfortable administration and to improve the bioavailability, meaning that the body will consume and absorb the cannabidiol to its complete potential.

Oils that consist of medium-chain triglycerides, such as fractionated olive oil, hemp seed oil, and coconut oil, constitute the most suitable carriers. These oils will not reduce the pureness of the oil by altering the taste or vital properties.

The carrier oil provides advantages of their own. For instance,  coconut oil can produce an energy lift and deliver the cannabinoids to the bloodstream faster. Hemp seed oil provides a helpful blend of fatty acids, and olive oil has a wonderful flavor.

The liver directly absorbs the compounds, and the body instantly metabolizes them into the bloodstream together with the CBD. 

Phase 7: Laboratory Testing

Once a carrier oil is added, the CBD oil is ready to be bottled, and a sample from each batch is sent for analysis by a third-party lab. The results of this analysis present a guarantee of the quality of the CBD oil.

Routinely the certificates of analysis will inform you of how much of particular cannabinoid is present in the oil. The most dependable labs also offer a terpene profile and the results of contaminant analysis.

Conclusion 

The entire CBD oil manufacturing process, when done in accordance with the best industry practices, is quite the harmonized chain of events. Each and every phase of the process carries its own challenges that result in high quality, pure CBD oil.

How a CBD oil is made presents a suggestion of its quality. CBD brands that are operating with transparency at the forefront of their culture will often produce and stock the best quality oils. The more information and evidence of good practice available for consumers to review, the better the chance that it is an exceptional CBD oil.

Women in Cannabis

Women in Cannabis

In light of International Women’s Day celebrated this past Sunday, March 8, we at Revexia felt inspired to bring light to the innovative group of women who have fundamentally impacted the cannabis community. This day was brought into a national holiday given the lack of rights and resources women were faced with for centuries. Exploring the history of this holiday shines light on the sheer persistence these women in cannabis have prevailed through to become the leaders they are today.

History Leading to International Women’s Day

Rhetoric surrounding change started sweeping the community of women back in the early 1900s. Women were legally barred from voting and education, had sparse access to economic opportunity as well as voice in the political realm, and were openly looked down upon. In response, a group of men and women (mostly women) gathered and drafted a declaration inserting women into legal memorandum asserting their deserved position in society. A few decades later, International Women’s Day was established in 1913, but was not recognized by the United Nations in 1975.

Why Women Are So Dominant in Cannabis Industry

Flash forward to 2012. Colorado and Washington propelled the cannabis industry into the mainstream marketplace by legalizing recreational cannabis usage, and women saw this as their time to shine. Because this trade was the first of its kind, women found they had the opportunity to shape the industry, not fit into the previously established patriarchal confines in the outside-of-cannabis business world.

There are numerous organizations dedicated to empowerment of women in the cannabis community, such as Women Grow, Illinois Women in Cannabis, and Ellementa. To bring these and others together, along with women not having capacity to belong to such an organization due to geographical limitations, a conference was held in Las Vegas late 2019 called the Women of Cannabis Conference. The possibility alone for an international conference to take place surrounding the sheer impact women have had in the industry is novel and exciting for female cannabis entrepreneurs.

Powerful Women Making an Impact

Karson Humiston, Owner and CEO of Vangst

Vangst has been an industry game changer. Noticing a gap in the cannabis industry, Karson Humiston created a platform that connects cannabis industry workers with careers through key players in the industry. A first of its kind, Karson Humiston fundamentally impacted the cannabis industry forever.

Dahlia Mertens, Owner of Mary Jane’s Medicinals

Dahlia Mertens founded Mary Jane Medicinals in response to her own personal introduction to cannabis infused oil. A trained massage therapist, she recognizes the importance of cannabis in self-care routines. Mary Jane Medicinals is one of the leading topical companies in the U.S. topical market.

Mara Gordon, Co-Founder and Chief Process Engineer of The Oil Plant

A woman grounded in science, Mara Gordon has brought cannabis into the mainstream through a medical lens. Her company Aunt Zelda provides contaminant-free high quality cannabis infused products in proper dosages and tailored to the individual patient. She also is a key advocate in the industry, having given a Ted Talk and participating in numerous documentaries to help break the stigma and misinformation surrounding cannabis.

Women Near and Dear to Us at Revexia

We also want to take a minute to thank the women on our team who make all of this possible. Although our staff may be small in numbers, our gratitude for the work these women complete each day is massive. Similarly, we extend our deepest appreciation for our customers who find relief from the products we believe in so deeply. Without each piece of this puzzle, Revexia would not be able to be where we are today.